(Source: fairey-tale, via medinaquirin)

This blog makes me feel like it's an unsafe place, because you have white people that are mixed with more white and just a small dash of Native or Indigenous people blood. They will NEVER know the true struggle of walking the line between one race and another.

youknowyouremixedwhen:

youknowyouremixedwhen:

I’m sorry to hear that :[

This blog is also for multiethnic folk as well as a reminder for you and others who follow us. As in, there will be monoracial people who will follow us, of any race, but are ethnically mixed.

No, people with more than one race than the other race(s) that they’re mixed with PROBABLY won’t know the true struggle of walking the line between one race and another.

Lastly, what would you like us to do? Police anyone who submits’ identities? That’s fucking gross. That would be too much energy spent on something that can end up being a “false alarm” and down right disrespectful to the person we question.

~ Tom

Yeah, I have to agree with Tom, especially on the last part. And I am genuinely sorry that you feel unsafe. I wish I could do more to ensure that you don’t.

However, because someone - blood wise - may not have as much PoC ancestry as you’d prefer does not make them any less mixed. Like, you can be light as hell and still connect with your culture (all of your culture)

As mods, it is not our jobs to be the gatekeepers on who is mixed enough. Seriously, a vested interest in preventing gatekeeping is a great deal of the reason why this blog exists. This /is/ the blog for the people who have been told over and over that they weren’t “x” enough to exist in other spaces.

Finally, to say that someone can never understand the true struggle of being mixed without having an actual conversation with them about their experiences comes off as presumptuous at best, and fucked up at worst. 

I’d honestly like to posit that there probably is no one true narrative of being mixed. There are commonalities that many of us share, but ultimately each of us has our own story, our own experiences, and our own struggles, and that story is just as unique as our heritage.

- Nina

I think that last bit is kind of the struggle of the mixed community. there are so many different stories and experiences and everyone’s connected with their culture in a different way and experiences life as mixed differently, so its hard to settle on one narrative I guess? and I am saying this as someone who’s 50/50, so I understand the balancing act of two wholly different cultures, but there are so many ways to be mixed that its hard to draw a line

mostly reblogging to say I agree with the mods. I think we need to start thinking of mixed as meaning not one thing but a near infinite amount of experiences

This is why you shouldn't click on the naked photos of Jennifer Lawrence

fabulouslyfreespirited:

If you deliberately seek out any of these images, you are directly participating in the violation not just of numerous women’s privacy but also of their bodies.
In what’s being called the biggest celebrity hacking incident in internet history, more than 100 female celebrities have had their private nude images stolen and published online. The bulk of the images posted have been officially confirmed as belonging to Jennifer Lawrence, but a complete list of victims’ names - including Krysten Ritter, Kate Upton, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Rihanna, Brie Larson and Kirsten Dunst - has been subsequently published. (Link does not contain pictures, only names.)
The images were first uploaded by an anonymous member of the underground internet sewer known as 4chan and have since been enthusiastically shared across platforms like Reddit and Twitter. A representative for Lawrence has confirmed the images are real, condemning the theft of them as a “flagrant violation of privacy” and adding that “The authorities have been contacted and will prosecute anyone who posts the stolen photos.”
There are a few different issues that a criminal act like this brings up, but before I get into them it’s necessary to make one thing clear: If you deliberately seek out any of these images, you are directly participating in the violation not just of numerous women’s privacy but also of their bodies. These images - which I have not seen and which I will not look for - are intimate, private moments belonging only to the people who appear in them and who they have invited to see them. To have those moments stolen and broadcast to the world is an egregious act of psychic violence which constitutes a form of assault.
The people sharing these images are perpetuating an ongoing assault. The people gleefully looking at them are witnessing and enjoying an ongoing assault. When you have been asked by victims of a crime like this not to exacerbate the pain of that crime and you continue to do so anyway, you are consciously deciding that your enjoyment, your rights and perhaps even just your curiosity are more important than the safety and dignity of the people you’re exploiting.
That out of the way, let’s get a few other things straight.
1. This is not a ‘scandal’
It’s a crime, and we should be discussing it as such. Some media outlets are salaciously reporting it otherwise, as if the illegal violation of privacy involving intimate images is little more than subject for gossip. When associated with sex, the word ‘scandal’ has been typically interpreted as something that assigns responsibility to all parties involved, a consensual act unfortunately discovered and for which everyone owes an explanation or apology. Remember when private nude photos of Vanessa Hudgens (whose name also appears on the list of victims) were leaked online and Disney forced her to publicly apologise for her “lapse in judgment” and hoped she had “learned a valuable lesson”? Never mind that Hudgens was an adult and a victim of privacy violation - the ‘scandal’ was painted as something for which she owed her fans an apology. Which leads us to:
2. These women do not ‘only have themselves to blame’
While depressing, it’s sadly unsurprising to see some people arguing that Lawrence et al brought this on themselves. Part of living in a rape culture is the ongoing expectation that women are responsible for protecting themselves from abuse, and that means avoiding behaviour which might be later ‘exploited’ by the people who are conveniently never held to account for their actions. But women are entitled to consensually engage in their sexuality any way they see fit. If that involves taking nude self portraits for the enjoyment of themselves or consciously selected others, that’s their prerogative.
Victims of crime do not have an obligation to accept dual responsibility for that crime. Women who take nude photographs of themselves are not committing a criminal act, and they shouldn’t ‘expect’ to become victims to one, as actress Mary E. Winstead pointed out on Twitter. 
Sending a photograph of your breasts to one person isn’t consenting to having the whole world see those breasts, just as consenting to sex with one person isn’t the same as giving permission for everyone else to fu*k you. Victim blaming isn’t okay, even if it does give you a private thrill to humiliate the female victims of sexual exploitation.
3. It doesn’t matter that ‘damn, she looks good and should own it!’
Stealing and sharing the private photographs of women doesn’t become less of a crime just because you approve them for fapping activity. I’m sure many of the women on this list are confident of their sexual attractiveness. It doesn’t mean they don’t value their privacy or shouldn’t expect to enjoy the same rights to it as everyone else. It also doesn’t mean they want strangers sweating over their images. That line of thinking comes from the same school which instructs women to either ignore of welcome sexual harassment when it’s seemingly ‘positive’ in its sentiments.
None of these women are likely to give a shit that you think their bodies are ‘tight, damn’. Despite what society reinforces to us about the public ownership of women’s bodies, we are not entitled to co-opt and objectify them just because we think we can defend it as a compliment.
I will not be seeking out these images out and I urge everyone else to avoid doing the same. I hope that all the women who have been victimised here are being appropriately supported by the authorities and their network of friends. And I hope sincerely that more people take a stand against this kind of behaviour.
Because this incident aside, it strikes me as deeply ironic that we will vehemently protest a free Facebook messenger app because we’re outraged at reports that it can access our phone’s numbers, and yet turn around and excuse the serving up of women’s bodies for our own pleasure. Our appreciation is no less disgusting just because it’s accompanied by the sound of one hand clapping.

(via gi-and-toxic)

thisiseverydayracism:

susiethemoderator:

joryuu:

thoughtsofablackgirl:

"Love In the Time of Tear Gas."  Picture from Ferguson

Why aren’t we seeing this everywhere? Soooo much more meaningful than this, which was everywhere:


Those were my EXACT thoughts.

We all know why.

thisiseverydayracism:

susiethemoderator:

joryuu:

thoughtsofablackgirl:

"Love In the Time of Tear Gas."  Picture from Ferguson

Why aren’t we seeing this everywhere? Soooo much more meaningful than this, which was everywhere:

Those were my EXACT thoughts.

We all know why.

(via squidsqueen)

owlmylove:

you don’t “beat” depression. you don’t “defeat” eating disorders. you survive them. stop making severe mental illnesses sound like something you can overcome just by throwing the right punch.

(via skindeap)

bagelbrother:

someone was like hey do a flower beard thing and i was like okay

(via takingbackhyrule)


My mom put these flowers in my dad’s beard in 1977. This is my favorite picture of him. :)

My mom put these flowers in my dad’s beard in 1977. This is my favorite picture of him. :)

(Source: lovechangeseverythang, via takingbackhyrule)

I wouldn’t necessarily mind people not knowing I’m gay, but I don’t like being thought of as straight — in the same way that I don’t mind people not knowing I’m a writer, but it would be awkward if they assumed I was an extreme skateboarder, because that’s so far removed from the reality of my life. But there is no blank slate where orientation is concerned; we are straight until proven otherwise. And if you’ve never seen how dramatically a conversation can be derailed by a casual admission of homosexuality, let me tell you, it gets awkward.

( My Life as an Invisible Queer - Cosmopolitan (via feministlibrarian)

(via goldenheartedrose)

)

Today is the first day
of the rest of it.
Of course there will be other first days
but none exactly like this.

(

dankyes (Mwaghavul)’

Yrsa Daley-Ward, ‘bone.’

now available at amazon.com

(Source: yrsadaleyward)

)

Nobody is saying anything at the dinner table tonight,
because everyone is too angry.
The only noise is the clinking of fine silver on bone china and
the sound of other people’s children playing outside
but this will give you poetry.


There is no knife in the kitchen sharp enough to cut the tension
and your grandmother’s hands are shaking.
The meat and yam stick in your throat
and you do not dare even to whisper, please pass the salt
but this will give you poetry.

Your father is breathing out of his mouth
he is set to beat the spark out of you tonight
for reasons he isn’t even sure of himself yet
You will come away bruised.
You will come away bruised
but this will give you poetry


The bruising will shatter
The bruising will shatter into black diamond
that you will use to make your eyes shine.
Maybe your life will work.
Most likely it wont at first
but that
will give you poetry.

(

'poetry'

Yrsa Daley-Ward, ‘bone.’

now available at amazon.com

(Source: yrsadaleyward)

)

absolutelyasianamerican:

Because I fear that many AsAms today are forgetting our history of solidarity with black lives and black power.  

We must not forget. 

(via mixedgirlrants)

she says she cries over me on the train to and from work and one day it will be better but it isn’t better now. she is just like my mother, but alive. knows how to love
quietly, completely.
something about the way black women hold your heart. you can leave them all you like but you cant stay gone.

(

'now that it's all over'

Yrsa Daley-Ward, ‘bone.’

'bone' by yrsa daley-ward is now available at:


amazon

http://www.amazon.com/bone-Yrsa-Daley-Ward/dp/1499170718/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1403057434&sr=8-1&keywords=yrsa+daley+ward

and also available internationally here

createspace: https://www.createspace.com/4492163?ref=1147694&utm_id=6026

(via thiswillnotlast)

(Source: yrsadaleyward, via yrsadaleyward)

)

Nicki Minaj is not a woman who easily slides into the roles assigned to women in her industry or elsewhere. She’s not polished, she’s not concerned with her reputation, and she’s certainly not fighting for equality among mainstream second-wave feminists. She’s something else, and she’s something equally worth giving credence to: a boundary-breaker, a nasty bitch, a self-proclaimed queen, a self-determined and self-made artist. She’s one of the boys, and she does it with the intent to subvert what it means. She sings about sexy women, about fucking around with different men. She raps about racing ahead in the game, imagines up her own strings of accolades, and rolls with a rap family notorious for dirty rhymes, foul mouths, and disregard for authority and hegemony.

While Beyoncé has expanded feminist discourse by reveling in her role as a mother and wife while also fighting for women’s rights, Minaj has been showing her teeth in her climb to the top of a male-dominated genre. Both, in the process, have expanded our society’s idea of what an empowered women looks like — but Minaj’s feminist credentials still frequently come under fire. To me, it seems like a clear-cut case of respectability politics and mainstreaming of the feminist movement: while feminist writers raved over Beyoncé’s latest album and the undertones of sexuality and empowerment that came with it, many have questioned Minaj’s decisions over the years to subvert beauty norms using her own body, graphically talk dirty in her work, and occasionally declare herself dominant in discourse about other women. (All of these areas of concern, however, didn’t seem to come into play when Queen Bey did the same.)

( Nicki Minaj’s Feminism Isn’t About Your Comfort Zone: On “Anaconda” and Respectability Politics | Autostraddle (via becauseiamawoman)

(via glitterfreckly)

)
tumblr staff:
hey guys we've just added this new feature to the site, isn't it great?
xkit guy:
here's the extension to get rid of this one